Berry Park | Brooklyn Rooftop

frozen arnold palmer at berry park

Berry Park is a bar on a Brooklyn rooftop, in that area of Williamsburg that starts to blend into Greenpoint. Cocktails are solid and fries are salty and crispy. I recommend the frozen Arnold Palmer as an overall crowd-pleaser, but the Rosemary’s Berry (Hendrick’s, St. Germain, prosecco, etc.) was a surprise win and possibly the only cocktail I’ve ever liked that’s on the very sweet side. Maybe the rosemary helped cut the sugar of the other ingredients. …

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Beauty & Essex | New York

the front door at beauty and essex in the les new york

Dear Shen Dove,

Beauty & Essex is a great place to eat (I’ve never had anything I didn’t like), try some interesting cocktails, and have a little fun. It has one of those totally unassuming fronts that are common with some of the popular spots in New York. In fact, the front room is a pawn shop filled with a lot of cool vintage finds. You can purchase anything in there that’s for sale.

I’ve always wondered if people wander in there with no idea that there’s a restaurant/club in the back.

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Mad. Sq. Eats | Eat, Drink and Be Merry

diners under marimekko umbrellas at mad sq eats

Mad. Sq. Eats is a fun — if crowded — place to spend an hour or two for dinner or happy hour. I have to confess a preference for Asiadog, which always has one of the longest lines. However, if you’re looking for dessert, grab a few cookies from momofuku milk bar and split some crepes and a bottle of wine from Bar Suzette. The mini food festival takes place ever spring and fall and is open from 11am – 9pm until May 31st. …

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Bronx Academy of Letters Benefit 2013 | Events


A whiskey-based cocktail made by Please Don’t Tell at the Bronx Letters 10th Anniversary Benefit.

If you can attend only one charity event throughout the entire year (and are also prepared to eat a lot of meat), you should make it the Bronx Academy of Letters Benefit. Tickets aren’t inexpensive, but the range of good food from so many good restaurants is staggering.

The benefit got me eating things I don’t even like, and taking chances on others. I ate roe, and I haven’t touched it since I left Japan in 2008. I gobbled down most of a piece of pizza from Roberta’s… and I’m lactose intolerant. Interestingly I was fine, meaning their mozzarella is made seriously right. Wasn’t about to try my luck with any of the dishes made with ricotta, though.  

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Pretty in Paisley | Epiphany Chocolates Giveaway (closed)


It’s been a bit of a sugary week here on Delayed Missives– and since when have I become a food blogger? First I spoke with the chef behind momofuku milk bar, and today I’m pleased to offer a giveaway sponsored by my favorite truffle makers: Epiphany Chocolates. Don’t know if you’ve noticed, but I personally haven’t felt much like writing about what I wore or what nail polish I used last, and I think we could all use some extra smiles and sweetness right now.

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An Interview with Christina Tosi | momofuku milk bar

Christina Tosi poses for a photo in front of the menu at momofuku milk bar Williamsburg.

Last week I visited momofuku milk bar and chatted with Christina Tosi—milk bar’s chef, owner and founder. Join us as we talk baking advice, creating that perfect recipe, and (of course) cookie dough.

It’s a sunny spring afternoon in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, current headquarters of momofuku milk bar. I’m a few minutes early, relaxed on a bench at the window and enjoying the change of scenery. An ice-cold arnie palmer is at my side. Life is outrageously idyllic.

Christina Tosi arrives, looking like she stepped out of an issue of Lula. She carries a J.Crew bag. “I’m Christina,” she says with a smile. I drank two cups of coffee and almost hyperventilated before this meeting, but her engaging manner puts me at ease in under thirty seconds. This is my first encounter with Christina’s effervescent personality. It’s easy to see that she truly loves what she is doing. Enthusiasm practically shines out of her.

Christina Tosi is someone I want to know.

I ask if she’ll be present at the upcoming Bronx Academy of Letters Benefit. She will, but she has a baking class to do first. Baking class? Apparently milk bar started offering them this February. I do not know how I did not know this. Before milk bar’s base of operations moved to Brooklyn, baking would often be visible to customers coming in for a fix of crack pie or cookies. Christina tells me that the baking classes were born out of missing that type of interaction.

Accessibility of this kind is unusual in the industry (or at least it seems so to me). From holding baking classes to giving out the recipes in cookbooks, momofuku is incredibly available to anyone, and I think that’s partly why the restaurant group boasts a huge cult following. Sure, you can follow chefs on Instagram, but classes with the chef where everyone from the raw beginner to the seasoned expert is welcome? That’s almost insane. It’s also very, very personal.

milk bar – and in fact every momofuku location – has a well-edited menu that doesn’t often change. Product development can have a long run time, Christina says. “Honestly, from a day, to a month… I’ll say, ‘I love this idea. We’ll work on it.’” She worked on ssäm bar’s pancake cake for four years. Sometimes the process is more important than the final product, she confesses. It’s fun to create something with an amazing back story. To make it onto the milk bar menu, something “has to be the most delicious version you can make of it. It’s also gut feeling, like… is it really done? The birthday cake? That had to be absolutely perfect.”

pancake cake aside, the most difficult thing Christina has ever had to make is the fried apple pie at ko. “With a tasting menu, you only get one chance. There was a time that I thought I was going to have to quit my job… Making it almost broke me.” I ask how she deals with working through hitting a wall during the struggle of creating something new. Does she step back? Get an outside opinion? At milk bar they try to incorporate recipe testing into the everyday schedule, but she says that being in the restaurant business really prepares you for getting things wrong. Christina stresses the importance of being honest—with your own creations as well as when scrutinizing others’. “Being inspired but not being influenced is an important thing to talk through. Your honesty is only as strong as [the product] you’re giving your customers,” she reflects thoughtfully.

It’s safe to say that Christina Tosi is one of the most creative chefs in the world. She’ll also dish out advice on how to become more like her in the kitchen: “It’s all trial and error and not being defeated. No idea is a bad idea. Some things are terrible,” she says, amused, “but the idea is never bad. You have to let go.” She doesn’t go to the store to buy ingredients for a new recipe. She’ll make sure she has two sticks of butter, and after that what she creates is born from whatever ingredients are on hand in the pantry. As someone whose only good baking is attributed to Williams-Sonoma cookbooks, I can’t even imagine what kind of terrible creation I would end up with. Of course, that’s why Christina Tosi makes the compost cookies and I just eat them.

“Would you ever sell the cookie dough at milk bar? Not for people to buy and bake, but for people to just sit with here and eat with a spoon,” I ask. Sometimes I have cookie dough, and it just doesn’t really make it into the oven, you know? “Girl, I hear you,” Christina says, and admits to often having a preference for raw cookie dough over the actual baked cookies. Offering cookie dough at milk bar is one of her visions. I’m sure it’s a health code nightmare, but I think that if anyone can do it, it’s milk bar.

Before I depart, Christina hands me a bag full of cookies. Earlier I revealed that I’m lactose intolerant, so she includes the dairy- and gluten-free 5 boro and perfect 10 kookies. “This is a great one to have late at night,” she says, indicating the chocolately 5 boro. “This one for the middle of the day.” I immediately ask about breakfast. Her answer? The compost. Definitely.

Christina Tosi (as well as cookies from momofuku milk bar) will be attending the Bronx Academy of Letters 10th Anniversary Benefit on April 30th. She would love to dream up special treats for events; however, everyone always asks for the cookies. milk bar’s latest treat is the molasses rye cookie, exclusively at booker and dax. Christina advises anyone into cocktails and mixology to give it a try. Look out for her new cookbook milk bar life, slated for 2014.

Bronx Academy of Letters 10th Anniversary | Events

The Urban Assembly Bronx Academy of Letters is having a fabulous benefit with a ridiculous amount of ridiculously good food– helloooo Prune, momofuku, Mission Chinese, etc. Anthony Bourdain is hosting and it’s kind of impossible to get into half of these places, so… see you there?

The benefit is being held at the Metropolitan Pavilion (110 W 19th Street between 5th and 6th) on Tuesday, April 30th from 6:30-9:30pm. Tickets are available online and start at $250, $150 of which is tax deductible.

Next up in insanely cool news: Sometime during the event when I’m not eating everything, I’ll be exchanging a few words with Anthony Bourdain. If you have a great original question let me know in the comments and I’ll see if I can fit it in! 

The Bronx Academy of Letters is founded on the belief that students who can express themselves clearly in writing can do better in any path they choose in life. Students achieve mastery of the word in the context of a rigorous, college-preparatory environment that celebrates vision, expression, tenacity, inquiry, integrity, and compassion. Learn more about the school here.

momofuku noodle bar | Lunch


Dear Christi,

I’ll never be over these pork buns. In fact, I could probably just eat pork buns as a meal.

My parents stopped in for a brief visit and I wanted to take them somewhere cool. It was between noodle bar and ssäm bar, but it’s hard to get ramen in the suburbs. My favorite momofuku restaurant is still ssäm bar, although there are few things equivalent to a good bowl of pork ramen. I hear the vegetable ramen (bottom right) is fantastic, though. And… well, I definitely wouldn’t say no to tomatoes in my soup.

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